What's in the PureBee soap?

What ingredients are in the soaps?

Our soaps contain natural vegetable oils, wax and vegetable butters: coconut oil, olive oil, mango butter, apricot kernel oil, rapeseed oil, beeswax and jojoba oil. These oils are mixed with a caustic soda that initiates the saponification process. Our natural soaps are colored with natural mineral pigments. No artificial substances are used - nature supplies everything you need to produce healthy and sustainable body care. The oils are supplemented by the active ingredients honey and propolis. As with all of our products, the ingredients are clearly stated.

Which fragrances are used for the soaps?

We only use natural, essential oils for fragrancing. These natural essential oils also consist of fragrances that can trigger allergies, so these allergenic fragrances must be specified separately in the ingredients (for lemongrass oil, for example, these are citral and geraniol). However, the specified allergens that you can find in our ingredients list all come from natural essential oils. Not all PureBee soaps are scented, however, for sensitive skin we recommend our original fragrance-free hand and body soap.

Soap hand soap Shower and bath soap Hair soap Scent addition Color addition Excessive grease

ja

ja

no

none

none

7%

ja

ja

no

Lemongrass Oil + Rosemary Oil

Mineral pigments green + mica

7%

ja

ja

no

Geranium oil + rose oil + orange oil

Mineral pigments white + red + mica

7%

ja

ja

no

lavender oil

Mineral pigments violet

7%

How are the soaps made?

Our natural soaps are produced using the gentle cold stirring process. We mix fats and oils with caustic soda (NaOH or sodium hydroxide), which is made available especially for cosmetics production. It is important to find the right balance. Every oil needs a certain amount of lye in order to be able to form a soap that is not too strongly basic or not too oily. If the amount of lye is too low, not all oils are saponified and the soap becomes greasy. After the fat and lye have been mixed, the lengthy process of saponification takes place. The secret of the handmade soaps lies in this cold process. From a chemical point of view, fats and oils consist of fatty acids and glycerine. Three fatty acid molecules are attached to one glycerine molecule. That is why one also speaks of triglycerides. During saponification, this fat molecule is broken down, the three fatty acid parts each combine with a lye molecule and thus form a "salt" from acid and base, i.e. a soap molecule. The glycerine is left over from this process. The soap industry is washing this glycerine out of the soap! It is too valuable to industry and can be used elsewhere. During the cold process, however, the natural glycerine remains in the soap and can thus develop its caring properties. That is the reason why cold-worked soaps are much gentler and also milder than industrially produced soaps.

Finally, the essential oils, mineral pigments, honey and propolis are added and the glue is poured into molds. Depending on the type of soap, the glue rests in the mold for a few hours to several days and sets. After molding, we cut the soap blocks into neat, handy 100g pieces (or 20g pieces for the minis). After cutting, the bars of soap can make themselves comfortable on the shelf and mature for 6-8 weeks. Then they are checked again for quality, packaged and sold. The cold stirring process is very gentle and the wonderful ingredients of the precious organic oils are not destroyed. The glycerine contained is created during the saponification process, no glycerine is added and acts as a moisturizer due to its water-binding property.

What does freshness mean?

All natural soaps go through the natural process of saponification and drying just described.
But this also means that the weight of a soap changes over time. We therefore always state the freshness weight of the soaps to ensure that the pieces are as equally large as possible.
When you mix the soaps, they are liquid and will be poured into a block. Then the soaps rest as a block for a few days, begin to set and are then cut to size. At this point, the consistency can be compared to that of a hard cheese. The cutting process of the soaps is 100% manual with us and therefore no soap is 100% the same as the other soaps. When cutting, however, we make sure that the soaps always weigh more than 100g, in most cases between 105-110g. This is the so-called freshness weight.
Natural soaps are sold as freshness weight in most cases. We are very open about it on the product page and we have also stated this on the packaging. Then after the soaps are cut they mature for 6-8 weeks and lose water. This means that once the soap reaches you, it will probably weigh less than 100g. This evaporation process continues even after the 6-8 weeks. So if you left the soaps with you for six months and then weighed them again, they would have lost a few grams again. This is quite normal with natural soaps and a process that cannot be stopped (and which you don't want to stop either). The weight of natural soaps is therefore given as the freshness weight, since the weight is not meaningful at later times and changes constantly. You always get the same amount of soap at any point in time, only the water it contains is less.

Which surfactants are in the soap?

Surfactants are molecular chains that adhere to water on the one hand and to fats on the other. Without surfactants, there would be hardly any washing effect and we need them to cleanse our skin. That is why we find surfactants in shower gels, shampoos, soaps and everything that is intended for cleaning.
There are therefore many different surfactants and they can be harmless or very problematic! The surfactants (chem .: sodium salts of fatty acids) formed in natural soaps by saponifying the vegetable oils and fats with caustic soda are all gentle on the skin and completely biodegradable. No surfactants are added, hence the term "natural soaps". With the slow saponification, sufficient glycerine and valuable fat accompanying substances (so-called unsaponifiable) are naturally formed, which are retained in the soap.
The widespread industrial soaps are made from a finished mass that contains artificial surfactants, such as dishwashing detergents or laundry detergents. So-called "glycerine soaps" (transparent soaps) are also made from it. The fact that glycerine is added, and perhaps one or the other natural active ingredient, does not make these soaps natural soaps!
Shampoos and shower gels should be produced with mild, purely vegetable surfactants such as sugar surfactants.

Do the soaps contain palm oil?

Palm oil is extracted from the pulp of the oil palm. The demand for and production of palm oil has risen sharply in recent years and it is now the most widely grown vegetable oil in the world. Palm oil has great foaming properties in soap, which is why it is very popular in natural soaps. To love the environment, we consciously avoid palm oil wherever possible and a good soap does not need palm oil to foam and maintain. Therefore none of our soaps contain palm oil.

Where are the soaps made?

Like all of our cosmetic products, we produce the soap by hand in our factory in Graben-Neudorf (Baden-Württemberg)

Do the soaps contain preservatives?

No, real natural soaps do not need a preservative because they are slightly alkaline (pH value 8-9) and therefore germs can only multiply with difficulty.

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